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Please comment on landscape shot
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Laurin Rinder


Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 45655
Location: Contact www.rinderart.com/Books and Workshops www.rindersmithphotography.com Youtube/rinder

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 12:03 pm     Reply with quote

copidosoma wrote:
ruxpriencdiam wrote:
mehulnaik wrote:
ruxpriencdiam wrote:
mehulnaik wrote:
Its HOya ND 400 ( 9 stop filter). It is a screw on filter so I just attached it onto my lens.
So its not a graduated filter?

Meaning one half is clear and then it graduates down and gets darker by 9 stops.


No its just a neutral density filter.
So the whole filter is 9 stops darker meaning you underexposed the entire shot.

You need the ND grads.

Look above at the pic i posted of what a ND grad is.


Hey Barry, Solid ND filters have a very specific use in landscapes (allowing you a very slow shutterspeed even in daylight to get that cloudy water look). Graduated NDs aren't the only useful landscape filter out there. In this case the solid one was a perfectly valid coice.

Having said that...

AS above, the tilted horizon (easy to fix) and fringing (harder to fix) are going to ding this one.




+1.wrong filter for this image.

barry...here ya go.Old school.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_dKH2mLt0c&feature=related
Jeffrey B. Banke


Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 20111
Location: Northern California

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 1:03 pm     Reply with quote

+2, also the fringing is relatively east to fix in ACR, what cannot be FIXED is the artifacts
mikenorton


Joined: 22 Aug 2005
Posts: 5056
Location: Guide Book http://www.lulu.com/shop/mike-norton/nortons-notes/paperback/product-5079819.html

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 3:14 pm     Reply with quote

A 9 stop filter!?
How long was your shutter speed?
What f-stop did you use?
Are you sure it's 9 stops?
How dark was the viewfinder?
How did you see to focus?
What did you focus on?
Nine stops?
OK I looked it up and it really exists here is the youtube clip I saw: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iltp8Ni3uY4

With all that being said I can tell you what this filter is good for: It is good for capturing the light as it changes. As the light changes so do the colors that the sensor records. As the colors change they turn into colors that the human eye can not see in person. Let me explain: as the sun is setting the light rays are passing through more of the atmosphere. The cool light end of the spectrum, i.e. the blues & greens are absorbed by the atmosphere, this makes the light warm, i.e. red, yellow, orange, and pink. The time when the sun is moving just above the horizon is when the colors will shift the most. With that 9 stop filter the shutter speed will likely be in the 30 second to 1 minute range. This 30 second or 1 minute exposure will record the light as the blues & greens drop out and are replaced with the red, yellow, orange, and pinks. This will cause the sensor to record colors that the human eye can not see in person but that can be captured and viewed in a photograph because that is the only place they exist.

People look at my portfolio and then ask me how I get the colors. A long exposure time is how I do it. Now I don't use a 9 stop ND filter because I have f45 on two shutter-lenses combinations and f64 on my other shutter-lens combination and I shoot film that is rated at ISO 50. But the long exposure that allows the film to capture the light as it is changing is how I get the colors. It works extremely well if the landscape being photographed is already red, orange, yellow or pink! Hello Utah!

Now to the OPs picture: I like it! The tops of the poles holding up the sky is fine with me. The horizon is a hard line placed low in the composition and the action is going left to right. The sun and white clouds on the right are near rule of thirds intersecting points and the colors on the water and in the sky transition nicely from light to dark. Is it in focus, does it have aberration and artefacting? I don't know but it's easy to learn how to photograph without them. Mehulnaik is on the right track, he or she has learned to shoot at sunset and be there longer.

Next time find a red composition where the sun is behind or over your shoulder and shoot with that 9 stop filter for 30 seconds or 1 minute and see what you get.
cpaulfell


Joined: 07 Dec 2011
Posts: 3870

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 3:50 pm     Reply with quote

Mike I love reading your comments and your photography is something to aspire towards.
mehulnaik


Joined: 19 Aug 2011
Posts: 229

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 4:10 pm     Reply with quote

Thanks all for your comments. I believe that I am not far away.

I do have Graduated ND filter as well. The reason I didn't use it because the scene was evenly lit and there wasn't any need to balance the exposure. Choice was solid filter was solely to get longer shutter speed and to get that dreamy water effect.

What is the best way get rid of the fringing? why it happens?
mehulnaik


Joined: 19 Aug 2011
Posts: 229

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 4:18 pm     Reply with quote

mikenorton wrote:
A 9 stop filter!?
How long was your shutter speed?
What f-stop did you use?
Are you sure it's 9 stops?
How dark was the viewfinder?
How did you see to focus?
What did you focus on?
Nine stops?
OK I looked it up and it really exists here is the youtube clip I saw: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iltp8Ni3uY4

With all that being said I can tell you what this filter is good for: It is good for capturing the light as it changes. As the light changes so do the colors that the sensor records. As the colors change they turn into colors that the human eye can not see in person. Let me explain: as the sun is setting the light rays are passing through more of the atmosphere. The cool light end of the spectrum, i.e. the blues & greens are absorbed by the atmosphere, this makes the light warm, i.e. red, yellow, orange, and pink. The time when the sun is moving just above the horizon is when the colors will shift the most. With that 9 stop filter the shutter speed will likely be in the 30 second to 1 minute range. This 30 second or 1 minute exposure will record the light as the blues & greens drop out and are replaced with the red, yellow, orange, and pinks. This will cause the sensor to record colors that the human eye can not see in person but that can be captured and viewed in a photograph because that is the only place they exist.

People look at my portfolio and then ask me how I get the colors. A long exposure time is how I do it. Now I don't use a 9 stop ND filter because I have f45 on two shutter-lenses combinations and f64 on my other shutter-lens combination and I shoot film that is rated at ISO 50. But the long exposure that allows the film to capture the light as it is changing is how I get the colors. It works extremely well if the landscape being photographed is already red, orange, yellow or pink! Hello Utah!

Now to the OPs picture: I like it! The tops of the poles holding up the sky is fine with me. The horizon is a hard line placed low in the composition and the action is going left to right. The sun and white clouds on the right are near rule of thirds intersecting points and the colors on the water and in the sky transition nicely from light to dark. Is it in focus, does it have aberration and artefacting? I don't know but it's easy to learn how to photograph without them. Mehulnaik is on the right track, he or she has learned to shoot at sunset and be there longer.

Next time find a red composition where the sun is behind or over your shoulder and shoot with that 9 stop filter for 30 seconds or 1 minute and see what you get.



Shutter speed was 92 secs
f/14
Focal length:18 mm
ISO:100

I set the focus manually first then mounted the filter as it was impossible to see once I have the filter on. I focused on those poles but because I was far enough I was able to focus on infinity.


Thanks for your comments. It's very interesting what you said.
semmickphoto


Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 10197
Location: http://semmickphoto.com

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 4:40 pm     Reply with quote

mehulnaik wrote:



Thanks for your comments. It's very interesting what you said.


+1
mikenorton


Joined: 22 Aug 2005
Posts: 5056
Location: Guide Book http://www.lulu.com/shop/mike-norton/nortons-notes/paperback/product-5079819.html

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:55 pm     Reply with quote

cpaulfell, Thank you.
mehulnaik & semmickphoto, Your welcome.
pinkcandy


Joined: 03 Mar 2008
Posts: 388
Location: I'm still looking for the good one

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:58 pm     Reply with quote

semmickphoto wrote:
Mike Price wrote:
... I find the tops of the poles exactly intersecting with the horizon distracting...


+1 Thats what was bothering me as well


+1
Laurin Rinder


Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 45655
Location: Contact www.rinderart.com/Books and Workshops www.rindersmithphotography.com Youtube/rinder

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 7:17 pm     Reply with quote

A good Link.Cool tool to have But...They are subject specific.

http://www.redbubble.com/people/peterh111/journal/4421304-the-ultimate-guide-to-neutral-density-filters
Jeffrey B. Banke


Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 20111
Location: Northern California

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 7:36 pm     Reply with quote

mehulnaik wrote:
Thanks all for your comments. I believe that I am not far away.

I do have Graduated ND filter as well. The reason I didn't use it because the scene was evenly lit and there wasn't any need to balance the exposure. Choice was solid filter was solely to get longer shutter speed and to get that dreamy water effect.

What is the best way get rid of the fringing? why it happens?


Fringing is caused by the quality or lack thereof the lens, cheaper the lens more the fringing, and is just one of the aberrations lenses exhibit.

It is important to understand that there is no such thing as the perfect lens, so all lenses have some aberrations, all-be-it smaller on more expensive lenses.

Lenses are made of several pieces of glass, or on REALLY cheap cameras plastic. These pieces of glass often are in contact (I.E. Glued together) there is an amount of refraction at each layer interface, manufacturers use different types of glass which changes the direction and the color properties of the light transmitted through the lens, in an attempt to limit aberrations.
This is why single focal length (non-zoom lenses) are always going to be better, and yet cheaper to make than any zoom, because they are simpler, fewer elements, fewer interfaces, less aberrations.

Some degree of fringing, vignetting and other aberrations can be corrected in ACR.
The amount in your image, looks like it could be fixed.

I was more concerned with the pixelation I was seeing around the post in the 100% blow up.
cpaulfell


Joined: 07 Dec 2011
Posts: 3870

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 7:44 pm     Reply with quote

I used a Tiffen HT (High Transmission) Neutral Density 1.2 (4-Stop) to get this shot.


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Laurin Rinder


Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 45655
Location: Contact www.rinderart.com/Books and Workshops www.rindersmithphotography.com Youtube/rinder

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 8:06 pm     Reply with quote

Just Playing around...Because I can, lol I added some interest I think.the reason I didn't care for the original was other that the tech stuff was the posts and the filter used. I don't think there was enough movement to warrent the use of that filter for effect. I also think you have a nice wall print in B&W.


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mehulnaik


Joined: 19 Aug 2011
Posts: 229

Post Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 9:48 pm     Reply with quote

rinder99 wrote:
Just Playing around...Because I can, lol I added some interest I think.the reason I didn't care for the original was other that the tech stuff was the posts and the filter used. I don't think there was enough movement to warrent the use of that filter for effect. I also think you have a nice wall print in B&W.


Agree with you. I was just trying different filters to see which one comes out best and I thought this one had best colors so I choose this image. Is it good enough for the first ten?
 
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